Nutrition and Diet for Arthritis

Like all other autoimmune diseases, the exact cause of arthritis, especially Rheumatoid arthritis is unknown to medical world.

Major culprits of autoimmune conditions are believed to be: poor nutrition and/or food allergies; exposure to the pollutants and heavy metals that contaminate our air, soil and water; overgrowth of pathogens such as bacteria, virus, mold-fungus-yeast and parasites; and toxic vaccinations and medical drugs.

Any of these can cause certain parts of your body, like your joints, to be unrecognizable to your body’s own immune system so that the body’s immune system attacks them as “invaders”. The sad part is that once one autoimmune condition sets in, another autoimmune disease almost always show up.

Nutrition response testing offers a systematic and extremely precise protocol in determining the deepest cause of a body’s autoimmune state.

Having said that, let me introduce several tips to avoid and/or minimize arthritic conditions.

  • Avoid Wheat, Sugar, and Dairies as they cause INFLAMMATION throughout the body. Actually, we avoid these three food groups, most of diseases will get better quite dramatically, in a short period of time.
  • Avoid greasy or spicy foods as they tend to create “dampness and heat” in the body that negatively affect the joints and cartilages.
  • Bone Broth, made of either organic chicken or organic beef (with marrow) as these are filled with collagen, numerous minerals and vitamins, and amino acids.
  • Ginger – A natural anti-inflammatory, available as powdered extracts in capsules as well as alcohol-based extracts. Follow the dosing directions on the label. Or make tea by combining one-half teaspoon of grated ginger root with eight ounces of boiling water. Cover and steep for 10 to 15 minutes, then strain and add honey to taste.
  • Fresh pineapple – Bromelain, an enzyme in pineapple, reduces inflammation. Be sure the pineapple is fresh, not canned or frozen.
  • Cherries – Recent research has shown that tart cherries are an excellent source of nutrients that may help to reduce joint pain and inflammation related to arthritis.
  • Fish – Cold-water fish such as salmon and mackerel contain omega-3 fatty acids, which help keep joints healthy as well as reduce pain and swelling. If you don’t care for fish, consider supplementing your diet with fish oil capsules.
  • Turmeric – Another natural anti-inflammatory. Look for an extract of whole turmeric, in health-food stores; follow the dosage directions on the label.

Nutrition and Diet Tips for Anxiety and Depression

Whether it is anxiety or depression, when it comes to any physiological and/or emotional issues, I need to repeat myself: Stay away from three food items: Sugar, Wheat, and Dairies. All these foods create empty heat in the body, dampen the body, and block the energy flow. Just removing these foods for even one week can make a huge difference in one’s emotional landscape.

Foods Helping Anxiety/Depression

Asparagus, avocados, and berries

Garlic, onion, cinnamon, and honey

Cashews, walnuts, and sunflower seeds

Chamomile tea, and green tea

Oysters, and grass-fed beef

Nutritional Supplements Recommended for Anxiety/Depression

Fish oil

Vit D, Vit B12, Vit C

Calcium

Probiotics

5HTP

Theamine(GABA)

St. John’s Wort

Valerian Root

L Tryptophan

Note: I have successfully used the following Standard Process products in treating anxiety/depression patients:

B6-Niacynamide, Mineral Tranquilizer, Orchex, E-Poise, Zymex, Livaplex, and Calcium Lactae.

Ulcerative Colitis – Tips for Dealing With It

Both Western and Chinese medicines recognize the importance of diet and its role in prevention and treatment of ulcerative colitis. Western medicine acknowledges dietary intake of certain factors (such as certain chemicals and drugs) may be linked to increased incidence of ulcerative colitis; Chinese medicine recognizes that dietary intake with excessive cold or raw food may injury the spleen and the stomach. Therefore, diet plays an important role in both prevent and effective treatment of the illness.

Food won’t prevent or cure IBD, but the right diet may diminish symptoms. The strategy is to focus on foods that reduce inflammation, to reestablish healthy bacteria in the gut and to pamper your intestinal tract. Keeping a food diary helps determine which foods trigger flare-ups and which seem to help.

Things to Avoid

  • Avoid any food which may trigger recurrence, such as certain chemicals, raw or cold food. Milk, cheese and other dairy products should be avoided especially if the patients have lactose intolerance.
  • Avoid sugar of all forms; avoid any wheat products especially during acute flare-ups.
  • High roughage food such as raw fruits or vegetables sometimes worsen intestinal obstruction and colic.
  • Alcohol should be avoided as it may be irritating to the stomach and the intestines.
  • Caffeine and carbonated drinks
  • Nuts, seeds, dried fruits
  • Spicy food may trigger certain nerve reactions in the digestive tract.
  • Certain over-the-counter or prescription antidiarrheal drugs may worsen the condition and create toxic megacolon.

What to Add

Everyone has different triggers; therefore it’s difficult to recommend certain types of food and/or supplements. In addition to avoiding the “wrong food,” it is equally important to have adequate calorie and fluid intake as malnutrition and dehydration are common problems associated with ulcerative colitis.  In general, two strategies that work are:

  • A bland, low-fiber may best during acute flares.
  • Eat 5 or 6 small meals a day.

All of the following recommendations should not be taken unless supervised by a qualified health care provider.

  • Oral iron supplements for those with frequent bleeding.
  • Folic acid: Many people who have ulcerative colitis have low levels of folic acid in their blood.
  • Omega-3 fatty acids found in fish oil: DO NOT take high doses of fish oil if you take blood-thinning medication.
  • Probiotics: Consult your doctor to be sure probiotics are appropriate for your case.
  • Vitamin D: is necessary to maintain strong bones. People with ulcerative colitis, especially those who take corticosteroids, often have low levels of vitamin D and are at risk for osteoporosis.
  • Calcium: is also needed for strong bones. Ask your doctor if you need a calcium supplement.
  • N-acetyl glucosamine: Preliminary research suggests that N-acetyl glucosamine supplements or enemas may improve symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease.
  • Psyllium seeds: Psyllium is a type of insoluble fiber, and may be irritating to some people, especially during flares. Some people may have better results using soluble fiber, such as flax seed or oat bran, in combination with or instead of psyllium.
  • Boswellia: Boswellia has anti-inflammatory properties.
  • Curcumin or turmeric: This has anti-inflammatory properties. People with gallbladder disease or gastro esophageal reflux disease (GERD), hormone-related cancers, or people who are taking blood-thinning medications, should not take curcumin without first consulting with their doctors.
  • Slippery elm: is a demulcent (protects irritated tissues and promotes their healing). Women who may be pregnant should never take slippery elm.
  • Marshmallow: is a demulcent and emollient. Avoid marshmallow if you have diabetes.
  • Chamomile: is often used to soothe digestive tract. It is usually taken as a tea. Chamomile can cause allergic reactions in some people, particularly those who are sensitive to ragweed. Medicine

Ulcerative Colitis What Are the Causes?

In conventional western medicines, no one knows what causes ulcerative colitis. The most likely theory is that it is caused by several factors ranging from genetics, faulty immune system reactions, and environmental influences, and over-consumption of saturated fat and/or processed foods. Most prominent risk factors for ulcerative colitis include:

  • Family history of the disease
  • Jewish heritage, especially Ashkenazi (European) Jews
  • A diet high in sugar, cholesterol, and fat (particularly from meat and dairy products)
  • Psoriasis. Studies show that psoriasis is associated both with Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis.

Nutrition Tips to Deal with Candidiasis

The following recommendations are by no means complete protocols.  Depending on the body’s constitutional weaknesses and reactions, these recommendations can be modified.  The key is to stay away from sugar, alcohol, carbohydrates, and dairies as much as possible. At the initial phase, all forms of protein including fish or chicken must be avoided as the main focus is to make candida starve to death.

First Phase—The Candida Cleanse Period (typically one week to 10 days)

  • Avoid all grains, especially wheat.
  • Avoid all proteins, except coconut milk or almond milk.
  • No nuts and all forms of pre-made salad dressings.
  • Fruit intake should be minimal.
  • Eat steamed organic vegetables as much as one can handle.
  • Eat salads made from leafy greens (like romaine lettuce) or bitter greens (like chard) and topped with just a bit of coconut oil and apple cider vinegar (or lemon juice).
  • Stay away from starchy vegetables like carrots, radishes, beets, sweet potatoes and white potatoes.
  • Drink plenty of pure water, a minimum of 72 ounces per day, to help flush the candida and by-products from the body.
  • Use Bentonite Clay to help surround the toxins and efficiently remove them from the body.
  • Nutritional supplements such as Grapefruit seed extract, Vitamin B12, Vitamin D, Garlic extract, Turmeric, Ginger, Cinnamon, or Oregano will be beneficial.

The Second Phase—The Candida Diet (8 to 10 weeks)

  • Re-introduce warm starchy vegetables such as sweet potatoes, yams, peas, mung beans, lentils, kidney beans, adzuki beans, carrots, beets, corn, butternut squash, spaghetti squash, acorn squash, zucchini, yellow squash, rutabaga and pumpkin.
  • One serving a day of grains from quinoa, barley, brown rice, or amaranth.
  • Keep eating green leafy vegetables.
  • Add cultured dairy, especially kefir. Kimchi, sauerkraut and other fermented foods are also
  • Keep staying away from refined carbohydrates and sugars.
  • Support the body with Vitamin C, Vitamin B12, Milk Thistle, Oregano Oil, Clove Oil, and Grape Seed Extract.

Candida Die-Off Symptoms

If one follows these recommendations, almost everyone will experience candida die-off symptoms. When candidas are being killed off rapidly, they cause metabolic reaction by releasing 70 different toxins into the body. Symptoms of candida die-off include:

  • Brain Fog
  • Headache
  • Fatigue
  • Dizziness
  • Intestinal distress including bloating, gas, constipation and nausea
  • Sweating and fever
  • Sinus infection
  • Skin breakouts (not limited to face)
  • Typical flu-like symptoms

These symptoms usually clear up in seven to 10 days.

After all symptoms have subsided, one should continue eating a diet high in protein, high-fiber vegetables, and limit grains, fruits, sugar and high-starch vegetables like white potatoes. Fermented vegetables and kefir are known to help the body stay in balance and keep the candida at bay.

Treating Candidiasis with Nutrition Response Testing

Nutrition response testing can easily identify the underlying causes of candidiasis. Too often, symptoms such as brain fog, hormonal fluctuations, or chronic urinary tract infections are found to be directly related to yeast/fungus overgrowth.

Almost always, certain food items show up as the culprits of candidiasis. Not only yeast/fungus, many of those with candidiasis also demonstrate problems with bacteria and/or parasite over-growth.

With nutrition response testing, it typically takes 12 weeks to clear out the most severe candidiasis symptoms. Patients are strongly advised to abstain from grains, sugar (including fruits), dairies, and alcohol. Real food-based supplements such as Standard Process’ Lact-Enz, Prosynbiotics, Multizymes, and Liver/Spleen Cleanse are frequently used.

Causes of Candidiasis

Interestingly, the main causes of the overgrowth of candida albicans are presumed to be MEDICATIONS and MEDICAL THERAPIES. These include: antibiotics, hormone replacement, corticosteroids, birth control pills, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and multiple surgeries. These medications and therapies tend to kill beneficial bacteria and interfere with normal hormone functions.  Improper diet, such as over-consumption of yeast products, sugar, or alcohol, also can promote yeast growth.

Candidiasis2

Those with immune or endocrine disorders such as patients with AIDS, cancer, or diabetes are more prone to candidiasis. Due to the hormonal involvement and the reproductive tract, women tend to present with more symptoms than men.

The effects of anti-fungal medicines are highly questionable. The protocols recommended by alternative health practitioners are extremely difficult to follow. Mostly, the protocols focus on “candida cleanse” that helps to rid the body of excess candida through the flushing of the digestive tract, and the introduction of healthy candida fighters found in fermented foods or probiotics.

Some suggest liquid-only cleanse for an extended period of time; some recommend a thorough gut reboot along with a drastic diet change.