0 comments on “Ming Mu Beans to Protect the Heart”

Ming Mu Beans to Protect the Heart

mung_beans

Drinking a bowl of cold sweet Ming Mu (or Mung) bean soup everyday is a Chinese habit during the hot summer – it’s a delicious dessert and a “cold” (yin energy) treat to cool down your system in the heat.

Beans are among the super-nutritious foods, and Ming Mu beans especially should be considered as a superfood as they are rich in protein, fiber, good carbohydrates, calcium, phosphorus, iron, and Vitamins A, B and D.

According to Traditional Chinese Medicine, since Ming Mu beans are “cold” (yin), they help dispel internal heat, clear away toxins, promote urination and relieve hot weather related diarrhea, and skins rashes. Ming Mu Beans are also good for calming the nerves, reinforce the Yuan Qi (Source Qi), relieve tensions around the eyes, improving the eyesight, and nourish the skin.

  1. Where to Get Ming Mu Beans

         Local Asian grocery stories. If you are too lazy to make a trip to the stores, you can  order it from Amazon.           mingmu beans 

2. How to Cook Ming Mu Beans

Wash the beans, bring them to a quick boil, reduce heat and simmer for 10 minutes. Done. The soup is clear and green. You can chill the soup in refrigerator and drink the soup and leave the beans.

The second method is for a stronger detoxification. Soak washed beans in hot water for 20 minutes. Then, boil the beans until they are soft and liquid is cloudy. Then eat the beans and the soup (season with a pinch of salt). You can also add honeysuckles(also available on Amazon), then cook for few more minutes. Honeysuckles tea is excellent in alleviating bronchial infections, clear the sore throat, and manage consistent coughing also. Mixing Ming Mu beans and honeysuckles are pretty powerful in purging damp heat from the body.

honeysuckle

This helps dispel toxins as these beans are highly diuretic. Eating Ming Mu beans regularly can help relieve high blood pressure, high cholesterol and hardening of the arteries. If you add honeysuckles in the beans, you can add a small amount of honey to alleviate bitter taste. 

However, if you are “cold” (too much yin energy), suffer from cold extremities or frequent diarrhea, don’t overdo these beans. They can aggravate the cold and cause other ailments. Also, make sure not to take the beans in less than half an hour before or after taking your medications, and /or herbal supplements.

You will be pleasantly surprised to find out how delicious these Ming Mu beans are.

0 comments on “Why is Your Heart So Vulnerable During the Summer?”

Why is Your Heart So Vulnerable During the Summer?

The organs that correspond with summer are the Heart, and in late summer towards the transition to autumn when the weather is hot and humid, the Spleen. The Kidneys are also their lowest energy point in the cycle and need some support during the summer.

In Chinese medicine, the Heart is considered to be the Emperor of all organs. In other words, all organs are important to make our bodies strong and healthy, but the most important organ of all is still the Heart. The Heart controls the blood circulation and in charge of protecting the blood vessels. In addition, the Heart is directly responsible for our consciousness, sleep, memory functions. The Heart provides a haven for the spirit, commonly known as the Shen (神 –Please note that the character for Shen, the spirit, is the same character referring to God). The Heart is most susceptible to external and internal heat.

heart and fireThose with healthy heart are well-grounded, not easily overwhelmed by outside influences. When the Heart-Kidney relationship is weak, the Shen escapes from its stable base in the Heart, and moved to the head, where thoughts rush around uncontrolled. Over time, this causes excessive worries, insomnia, irregular heartbeat, and wild dreams.

Those who already have heart-related conditions such as high blood pressures, atrial fibrillation (rapid and irregular heartbeat, fluttering or thumping on the chest, dizziness, shortness of breath, faintness or confusion, fatigue when exercising, etc.), or previous history of stokes need to be extra careful during the hot summer season. In addition to avoiding excessive heat, one needs to adopt a sensible diet, enough rest, and calm attitudes to protect the heart.

 

0 comments on “Protect Your Heart During the Summer with Ming Mu Beans”

Protect Your Heart During the Summer with Ming Mu Beans

The weather of this summer has been nothing but usual: record-breaking burning hot days, and non-stop rain with high humidity forecasted for the next few weeks. These crazy weather patterns seem to be universal all around the globe. Our precious Heart, heart health 638x403which has been under so much stress due to an extremely volatile and chaotic energy surrounding this planet, is the most vulnerable during the summer months. Chinese medicine considers Ming Mu beans as one of the most effective remedy in protecting our heart during the summer season.  

0 comments on “The Second Point: Pericardium 8 (Laogong) “Palace of Labor””

The Second Point: Pericardium 8 (Laogong) “Palace of Labor”

Laogong or Pericardium 8 is in the center of the palm, between the 2nd and 3rd metacarpal bones, closer to the 3rd metacarpal bone. laogong-56a92d8b5f9b58b7d0f8f31eWhen a fist is made, the point is where the tip of the middle finger touches.

Taoist practitioners and other energy healers who use Qigong emission (external qi therapy) techniques to amplify and balance another person’s Qi frequently use this point from which to emit energy. This point has a direct connection with Kidney 1. Any change at Kidney 1, for example a weight shift, has an immediate and direct reflection on Laogong. In Qigong practices, these four points must connect to Dantien at the lower abdomen for the Qi of the entire body to be integrated.

This point must be open and hollow for Qi to spread into the hand and fingers, and to the entire upper body. It is extremely important point to release pent-up heat in the heart and the head. Laogong is excellent in calming the spirit and resolving exhaustion and fatigue.

HOW TO ACTIVATE LAO GONG

pc8To massage your own Lao Gong, simply rest one hand, palm up, then use the other hand’s thumb to locate and press Laogong. Apply moderate pressure, with your thumb, moving it in tiny circles, as you place your mental focus gently upon the point. Again, two or three minutes will be sufficient.

The sequence of massaging is left Yongquan, left Laogong, right Laogong, then right Yongquan, to make a full circle. It’s best to use this technique before bed, however, it can be used anytime of the day. One full week of self-massaging  these four points will renew your vitality tremendously.

0 comments on “The First Point: KID 1 (Yongquan) “Bubbling Well””

The First Point: KID 1 (Yongquan) “Bubbling Well”

acu-points-kid-1The first point is Kidney 1, or YongQuan, located at the sole of the foot. This point lies in the depression that appears when the toes are curled. It is between the second and third metatarsals, about one third of the distance between the base of the second toe and the heel.

Yongquan is the only acupuncture point on the sole of the foot, the lowest and most Yin part of the body. In my clinical experiences, I’ve found that Kidney 1 is almost completely blocked for most people. Perhaps, it means that in this cyberage, we have simply lost the key in connecting with Mother Earth.

Actually, we use Kidney 1 all the time when our feet are on the ground. Through this point, we maintain our contact with the Earth. This point can be used as a portal through which we can draw upon the energy of the Earth as a tree’s roots draw nourishment from the soil.

Yongquan is a major energy vortex that has the ability to revitalize body, mind and spirit. When a person lacks stamina, strength, will or perseverance, Kidney 1 can help him/her to draw on reserves in order to get a kick-start.This point can also be used in restoring consciousness when someone has fainted. Additionally, this point has been widely used in treating dizziness, headaches, brain-fog, blurred vision, nosebleed and hypertension.

kidney1acupointApply a gentle but firm pressure on this point for two or three minutes. In the beginning, it can be very painful, but the the pressure will lessen as you progress. Always start with left Kidney 1, then progress to your left hand point, LaoGong.

0 comments on “How to Perform “bloodletting”?”

How to Perform “bloodletting”?

Where Do You Need to Prick?

For stroke-like symptoms, traditional Chinese medicine suggests puncturing the finger tips of all 10 fingers. In my opinion, it’s a bit too much; puncturing the tip of middle finger is sufficient. Puncturing both right and left finger tips can be beneficial, but the key point to puncture is the LEFT middle finger tip. This point is called Pericardium 9 (Zhong Chong, Chinese Character 中衝, meaning Central Hub). As shown in the picture, the pericardium meridian starts right outside of the heart (PC1) and ends at PC9 at the middle finger tip. (Note: The pericardium is two thin layers of a sac-like tissue that surrounds the heart, holds it in place and helps it work.)pericardium-meridian

What do you need for bloodletting?

Sterilized medical lancets, Alcohol swabs for sterilization, Sterilized cotton balls, Biohazard trash container, First-aid cream or gel, and First-aid bandages.

How to do bloodletting

Swab the tip of the middle finger with alcohol, then insert the lancet quickly in a shallow depth. Those with a very high blood pressure may experience blood shooting out as soon as lancets are inserted (this will drop blood pressure immediately). Some may have to squeeze out the finger tips. Elicit a few drops of blood. Absorb the blood with sterilized cotton, and dispose in the biohazard trash container along with the used lancets. Make sure bleeding stops completely by pressing hard with sterilized cotton ball. Apply first-aid cream or gel, or place a band-aid on the points that are bled to prevent infection, and then wash your hands.

The frequency of bleeding depends upon the patient’s medical condition. If the patient has more than a few symptoms of a TIA on a regular basis, bleeding can be performed once a day until the symptom abates. If the patient has a mild condition, bleeding can be done 1-2 times per week.

For nutritional support, I would highly recommend a supplement called “Cardo-Plus” produced by Standard Process. I would love to hear from you if you would practice bloodletting and what kind of results you have experienced.

For general health of the heart, I cannot think of anything better than “meditation focusing on slow breathing.”  If you suspect you have some TIA symptoms, think of it as if your “inner self” is calling for your attention.

0 comments on ““Bloodletting” to Prevent Mini-Stroke?”

“Bloodletting” to Prevent Mini-Stroke?

Most of stroke prevention programs are geared to lowering cholesterol level, modest exercise, and modified diet. All of these are good for not only heart diseases, but overall health of all ages. But is there a really impressive, well-proven method to prevent strokes? Well, there is an ancient healing technique called “bloodletting.”  My late father had never failed carrying a few medical lancets with him, especially when he had to take a long flight. In many Asian countries, “bloodletting” has long been considered one of the most effective measure in preventing and treating stroke-like conditions.

What is “Bloodletting”?

bloodlettingBloodletting literally means let the blood coming out by puncturing some part of the body. According to Chinese medicine, bloodletting has many functions: speeding up the blood flow, transforming stagnation and clearing internal heat (associated with the heart). Surprisingly, this particular technique has been used throughout the world (from the land of Hippocrates, Mid-eastern countries, and Asian countries) well into the 20th century. These days, most Chinese medical doctors and acupuncturists shun away from bloodletting, mainly due to blood-borne disease scares (The state of California prohibits bloodletting).

Numerous research studies (mostly conducted in China) have been published asserting the efficacy of bloodletting. Not only preventing strokes and treating post-stroke symptoms, bloodletting has widely been used in treating tonsillitis, severe earaches, asthma, febrile disease, hypertension, back pain, and even eczema.