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Ming Mu Beans to Protect the Heart

mung_beans

Drinking a bowl of cold sweet Ming Mu (or Mung) bean soup everyday is a Chinese habit during the hot summer – it’s a delicious dessert and a “cold” (yin energy) treat to cool down your system in the heat.

Beans are among the super-nutritious foods, and Ming Mu beans especially should be considered as a superfood as they are rich in protein, fiber, good carbohydrates, calcium, phosphorus, iron, and Vitamins A, B and D.

According to Traditional Chinese Medicine, since Ming Mu beans are “cold” (yin), they help dispel internal heat, clear away toxins, promote urination and relieve hot weather related diarrhea, and skins rashes. Ming Mu Beans are also good for calming the nerves, reinforce the Yuan Qi (Source Qi), relieve tensions around the eyes, improving the eyesight, and nourish the skin.

  1. Where to Get Ming Mu Beans

         Local Asian grocery stories. If you are too lazy to make a trip to the stores, you can  order it from Amazon.           mingmu beans 

2. How to Cook Ming Mu Beans

Wash the beans, bring them to a quick boil, reduce heat and simmer for 10 minutes. Done. The soup is clear and green. You can chill the soup in refrigerator and drink the soup and leave the beans.

The second method is for a stronger detoxification. Soak washed beans in hot water for 20 minutes. Then, boil the beans until they are soft and liquid is cloudy. Then eat the beans and the soup (season with a pinch of salt). You can also add honeysuckles(also available on Amazon), then cook for few more minutes. Honeysuckles tea is excellent in alleviating bronchial infections, clear the sore throat, and manage consistent coughing also. Mixing Ming Mu beans and honeysuckles are pretty powerful in purging damp heat from the body.

honeysuckle

This helps dispel toxins as these beans are highly diuretic. Eating Ming Mu beans regularly can help relieve high blood pressure, high cholesterol and hardening of the arteries. If you add honeysuckles in the beans, you can add a small amount of honey to alleviate bitter taste. 

However, if you are “cold” (too much yin energy), suffer from cold extremities or frequent diarrhea, don’t overdo these beans. They can aggravate the cold and cause other ailments. Also, make sure not to take the beans in less than half an hour before or after taking your medications, and /or herbal supplements.

You will be pleasantly surprised to find out how delicious these Ming Mu beans are.

0 comments on “Why is Your Heart So Vulnerable During the Summer?”

Why is Your Heart So Vulnerable During the Summer?

The organs that correspond with summer are the Heart, and in late summer towards the transition to autumn when the weather is hot and humid, the Spleen. The Kidneys are also their lowest energy point in the cycle and need some support during the summer.

In Chinese medicine, the Heart is considered to be the Emperor of all organs. In other words, all organs are important to make our bodies strong and healthy, but the most important organ of all is still the Heart. The Heart controls the blood circulation and in charge of protecting the blood vessels. In addition, the Heart is directly responsible for our consciousness, sleep, memory functions. The Heart provides a haven for the spirit, commonly known as the Shen (神 –Please note that the character for Shen, the spirit, is the same character referring to God). The Heart is most susceptible to external and internal heat.

heart and fireThose with healthy heart are well-grounded, not easily overwhelmed by outside influences. When the Heart-Kidney relationship is weak, the Shen escapes from its stable base in the Heart, and moved to the head, where thoughts rush around uncontrolled. Over time, this causes excessive worries, insomnia, irregular heartbeat, and wild dreams.

Those who already have heart-related conditions such as high blood pressures, atrial fibrillation (rapid and irregular heartbeat, fluttering or thumping on the chest, dizziness, shortness of breath, faintness or confusion, fatigue when exercising, etc.), or previous history of stokes need to be extra careful during the hot summer season. In addition to avoiding excessive heat, one needs to adopt a sensible diet, enough rest, and calm attitudes to protect the heart.

 

0 comments on “Protect Your Heart During the Summer with Ming Mu Beans”

Protect Your Heart During the Summer with Ming Mu Beans

The weather of this summer has been nothing but usual: record-breaking burning hot days, and non-stop rain with high humidity forecasted for the next few weeks. These crazy weather patterns seem to be universal all around the globe. Our precious Heart, heart health 638x403which has been under so much stress due to an extremely volatile and chaotic energy surrounding this planet, is the most vulnerable during the summer months. Chinese medicine considers Ming Mu beans as one of the most effective remedy in protecting our heart during the summer season.  

0 comments on “Self-acupressure on the Suboccipital Muscles”

Self-acupressure on the Suboccipital Muscles

The good news is that you don’t need to know exactly where the muscles are or what their names are. Wherever it hurts and feels tense around the suboccipital area, apply gentle but firm pressure, two or three minutes at one place, then move to the next tender spot.

Personally, I start with the mid-centerline right underneath the occiput, using my middle self massage suboccipitalfinger on both sides, tilting the head slightly backward. Very often, I am startled to find out how much of tension there is on that point. About two minutes will do the job.

Then, I move my fingers downward, slightly outside of the mid-centerline. I stay at tender spots for about two minutes.

The next step is go to wherever there is tenderness in the whole region. Since I am well aware of major acupuncture points in the area, I go through several points such as:

    1. Gallbladder 20: Headache; visual dizziness; pain and stiffness of the neck; gb20bl10painful reddening of the eyes; deep-source nasal congestion; pain in the shoulder and back; heat diseases; common cold; epilepsy.
    2. Bladder 10: Pain and stiffness of the neck, occipital headaches, upper back/shoulder pain, cold and flu symptoms, eye pain and blurry vision, epilepsy, manic episodes, excessive talking.  
    3. GV 16: headaches, stiff neck, aversion to cold and wind, dizziness, numbness, twitching of eyelids, asthma, difficulty of breathing, MANIA and Hysteria.

Some people use tennis ball, massage instruments, and/or some other apparatus. I’ve found that nothing works better, faster than your own fingers. If you have bad arthritis on the fingers, use some towel, roll it up tightly, and lay on top of it, placing the towel right under the occiput.

It usually takes 10 minutes to release the tension in the suboccipital area. You will be amazed at how wonderful you will feel if you practice these self-acupressure on yourself. Not only your tension and headaches will be minimized, you will feel much clearer in your thinking, even feel peaceful. If you have tendency to have “excessive nervous talking, mania, and/or hysteria,” this self massage will certainly help a great deal.

 

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Suboccipital Muscles

subocci-pain

The suboccipital muscles are a group of four muscles located on each side of the back of the neck just below the base of the skull. The muscles connect the skull with the top two vertebrae of the neck. Located right underneath the occipital bone (the pronounced protrusion of the back of the head), there are four paired muscles as shown in the suboccipital musclespicture.

These muscles are designed to sit right on top of the cervical spine, however, most of us tend to lean forward habitually. Texting, using computers, or even when we eat, we place our ears way forward than our shoulders. As a result, these suboccipital muscles tend to get stretched too much on one wide, crunched up, and stiffened over time. Misalignment of the suboccipital muscles becomes a prime cause of head and neck tension and shoulder aches. Prolonged neck tension may permeate toward the frontal area, causing temple and frontal headaches, and may interfere with the blood flow to the eyes, resulting in painful & burning eye syndromes.

 

0 comments on “Stiff neck, Migraines, and Eye pain? Release Suboccipital Muscles”

Stiff neck, Migraines, and Eye pain? Release Suboccipital Muscles

scalpelpointsOver the course of years of treating human body, I’ve found close to 100% of people over the age of 35 have very stiff neck. Stiff and rigid neck often accompany migraines, shoulder pain, frontal sinus headaches, and eye pain. It’s hard to believe, but stiff neck is also directly associated with the lower back and sacrum pain. There’s an easy way to deal with these issues: self-massage the suboccipital muscles, behind your head.  

0 comments on ““Beating the Heavenly Drum” –Qigong Exercise”

“Beating the Heavenly Drum” –Qigong Exercise

I discovered this exercise only a few weeks ago after I did a frantic research on tinnitus for my patient. Turned out to be this “Beating the Heaven Drum” is an age-old Taoist Qigong exercise, practiced mostly by Taoist monks in northern China. This exercise is refuted to be a valuable tool in aiding and maintaining a healthy ear, hearing mechanism, and maintaining a clear mentality. There are two ways to do this exercise.

  1. Method 1

Take a moment to relax by breathing slowly and deeply sitting on a chair or on the floor. When ready, close the ear canal by pressing on the tragus (stick-out part in front of ear canal) with your index finger. tragus

Tap gently on your index finger with the same hand’s middle finger, in a slow steady rhythm. Tap 12, 24 or 36 times and then release the fingers from the ears and rest. Tap both ears simultaneously or alternatively on each ear. Repeat the cycle three times. Ideally, you need to do this exercise one to three times a day, depending on the severity of ear ringing.

beating the heavenly drum2

When tapping on the index finger, make sure you hear a hollow metallic drum-like sound. The pressure shouldn’t be too hard, but firm enough to elicit metallic sounds. The key is to maintain a relaxed state of mind, not rushing through the exercise, focusing on the maximum benefit not only for the ears, but for the entire body.

  1. Method 2

Take time and relax for a few minutes breathing in and out slowly. Close your ears by placing your palms over them, with your fingers facing towards the back of the head. beataing the heavenlydrumTap the back of your head with all eight fingers, OR place your index fingers right underneath the occiput (the pronounced protrusion of skull, slightly above the base of the skull), and then put the middle fingers over your index fingers and snap them down on the occipital bone.posterior-view-of-the-skull-parietal-bone-occipital

The best results can be achieved through a steady pulse of beating. Again, tap 12, 24 or 36 times using either the alternating or simultaneous tapping. Repeat the sequence 3 times a day.  

Some people report immediate relief with this exercise, while for some, it takes a few days to see a real impact. Repeat the tapping as long as ringing persists.

Note: Another excellent relief can be found by placing heated salt pouch (2 Tsp of heated salt in a cotton pouch) over the ears for about 10 minutes.