Ulcerative Colitis – Tips for Dealing With It

Both Western and Chinese medicines recognize the importance of diet and its role in prevention and treatment of ulcerative colitis. Western medicine acknowledges dietary intake of certain factors (such as certain chemicals and drugs) may be linked to increased incidence of ulcerative colitis; Chinese medicine recognizes that dietary intake with excessive cold or raw food may injury the spleen and the stomach. Therefore, diet plays an important role in both prevent and effective treatment of the illness.

Food won’t prevent or cure IBD, but the right diet may diminish symptoms. The strategy is to focus on foods that reduce inflammation, to reestablish healthy bacteria in the gut and to pamper your intestinal tract. Keeping a food diary helps determine which foods trigger flare-ups and which seem to help.

Things to Avoid

  • Avoid any food which may trigger recurrence, such as certain chemicals, raw or cold food. Milk, cheese and other dairy products should be avoided especially if the patients have lactose intolerance.
  • Avoid sugar of all forms; avoid any wheat products especially during acute flare-ups.
  • High roughage food such as raw fruits or vegetables sometimes worsen intestinal obstruction and colic.
  • Alcohol should be avoided as it may be irritating to the stomach and the intestines.
  • Caffeine and carbonated drinks
  • Nuts, seeds, dried fruits
  • Spicy food may trigger certain nerve reactions in the digestive tract.
  • Certain over-the-counter or prescription antidiarrheal drugs may worsen the condition and create toxic megacolon.

What to Add

Everyone has different triggers; therefore it’s difficult to recommend certain types of food and/or supplements. In addition to avoiding the “wrong food,” it is equally important to have adequate calorie and fluid intake as malnutrition and dehydration are common problems associated with ulcerative colitis.  In general, two strategies that work are:

  • A bland, low-fiber may best during acute flares.
  • Eat 5 or 6 small meals a day.

All of the following recommendations should not be taken unless supervised by a qualified health care provider.

  • Oral iron supplements for those with frequent bleeding.
  • Folic acid: Many people who have ulcerative colitis have low levels of folic acid in their blood.
  • Omega-3 fatty acids found in fish oil: DO NOT take high doses of fish oil if you take blood-thinning medication.
  • Probiotics: Consult your doctor to be sure probiotics are appropriate for your case.
  • Vitamin D: is necessary to maintain strong bones. People with ulcerative colitis, especially those who take corticosteroids, often have low levels of vitamin D and are at risk for osteoporosis.
  • Calcium: is also needed for strong bones. Ask your doctor if you need a calcium supplement.
  • N-acetyl glucosamine: Preliminary research suggests that N-acetyl glucosamine supplements or enemas may improve symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease.
  • Psyllium seeds: Psyllium is a type of insoluble fiber, and may be irritating to some people, especially during flares. Some people may have better results using soluble fiber, such as flax seed or oat bran, in combination with or instead of psyllium.
  • Boswellia: Boswellia has anti-inflammatory properties.
  • Curcumin or turmeric: This has anti-inflammatory properties. People with gallbladder disease or gastro esophageal reflux disease (GERD), hormone-related cancers, or people who are taking blood-thinning medications, should not take curcumin without first consulting with their doctors.
  • Slippery elm: is a demulcent (protects irritated tissues and promotes their healing). Women who may be pregnant should never take slippery elm.
  • Marshmallow: is a demulcent and emollient. Avoid marshmallow if you have diabetes.
  • Chamomile: is often used to soothe digestive tract. It is usually taken as a tea. Chamomile can cause allergic reactions in some people, particularly those who are sensitive to ragweed. Medicine

6 Food Tips for Autoimmune Disorders

A class of plant chemicals — known as bioflavonoids — has been found to dramatically reduce inflammation and improve symptoms associated with autoimmune disorders.

Tea
Both green and black tea contain the flavonoids catechins and theaflavins, which are beneficial in autoimmune disease.

Apples
Apples contain the flavonoid quercetin, which can reduce allergic reactions and decrease inflammation. Quercetin also occurs naturally in other foods, such as berries, red grapes, red onions, capers and black tea.

Carrots
Carotenoids are a family of plant pigments that include beta-carotene. A lack of carotenoids in the diet is thought to promote inflammation. Good sources of carotenoids include apricots, carrots, pumpkin, sweet potato, spinach, kale, butternut squash and collard greens.

autoimmune and nutrition 2

Ginger
Recent studies show that ginger reduces inflammation by inhibiting prostaglandin and suppresses the immune system’s production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, reducing disease severity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

Omega-3
Omega-3 essential fatty acids can counter the formation of chemicals that cause inflammation. Good natural sources include flaxseed oil and salmon.

Fiber
A healthy and active colon can decrease food sensitivity, which, in turn, can lighten the burden on your immune system.

autoimmune and nutrition

Foods to Help You Look Your Best

Be sure to integrate these items into your diet to help keep your skin look its best:

Vitamin A: Acting as an antioxidant to neutralize harmful elements in our skin, vitamin A helps to prevent wrinkles, resist infection and maintain the skin’s elasticity. One of the best places to get vitamin A is from vegetables that are deep orange in color, such as carrots or sweet potatoes.

Blackberries, Blueberries, Strawberries and Plums: Antioxidants and other phytochemicals in these fruits can protect cells from damage and disintegration, thus guarding against premature aging. In a study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, these four fruits weighed in with the highest “total antioxidant capacity” of any food.

Essential Fatty Acids (EFAs): Responsible for skin repair, moisture content and flexibility, and because the body cannot produce its own, EFAs must be obtained from one’s diet. Fish, walnuts and flaxseed oil are great sources of omega-3 fatty acids.

Selenium: An antioxidant mineral responsible for tissue elasticity and healthy skin, selenium can be found in brown rice, turkey, tuna and Brazil nuts

Green Tea: Green tea’s ability to slow down the development of some signs of aging is attributed to its high levels of polyphenols, which have been well-documented for their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.

Water: Essential to maintaining your skin’s elasticity and suppleness.

Fight Fibromyalgia with Nutrition Response Testing

As in any other imbalances in the body, we believe the root cause of Fibromyalgia can be found in one of the following areas:

  • Immunological challenges (virus, bacteria, yeast, or parasites)
  • Food issues (too much of sugar, wheat, eggs, meat, dairies, etc.)
  • Metal toxicity
  • Chemical toxicity
  • Scar tissue

In my clinical experiences, metal toxicity, especially mercury poisoning on the nervous system, makes the top of the list when it comes to treating Fibromyalgia.

fibromyalgia

Typically, it takes six months to a year to experience tangible, long-lasting effects.  In most cases, we strongly recommend diet and life-style changes for Fibromyalgia patients.

Some key nutrients in fighting Fibromyalgia include:

B-Complex

Found in whole grains, beans, nuts, chicken, fish and eggs; B complex vitamins directly influence the nervous system’s proper functioning and combat nerve problems such as tingling and tenderness.

Magnesium

Found in nuts, grains, beans, fish, meat and dark green vegetables magnesium is needed for muscle flexibility and bone, protein and fatty acid formation. Magnesium is also integral in making new cells, relaxing muscles, clotting blood, aiding in calcium absorption and activating B vitamins.

Omega 3

Directly affecting cellular function, this fatty acid found in fish minimizes nerve sensitivity and improves cognition.

Vitamin C

Helps combat stress, builds the immune system and reduces swelling. Vitamin C is found in a variety of fresh fruits and vegetables including citrus fruits, green vegetables, tomatoes and berries.

Water

Increases circulation of oxygen and nutrients throughout the body and helps to eliminate waste.

Call us today – don’t delay, don’t live in pain – we are here to help you! Call us at 201-760-8811!

Five Nutrients to Support Your Endocrine Health

Fish – Fish provides Omega-3, Omega-6, and Omega-9 oils that directly affect cognitive function, cellular function and kidney function–all of these are under the control of the endocrine system.

Garlic – Garlic boosts immunity and regulates blood sugar levels.

five nutrients for endocrine

Calcium – Calcium keeps nerves healthy and ensures their ability to communicate effectively. Milk, cottage cheese, cheese, leafy greens, dried beans and yogurt are all rich in calcium.

Vitamin B and B complex – These vitamins directly influence the nervous system’s proper functioning and health, as well as one’s physical and mental performance concerning the nervous system. Vitamin B and B complex are found in chicken, fish, eggs, whole grains, beans and nuts.

five nutrients 2

Vitamin C – Adrenal glands have a very high content of ascorbic acid (vitamin C). This vitamin helps the adrenal glands produce more of the disease-fighting hormone. A continued stressful environment depletes vitamin C reserves and increases the tendency for infection and disease. Good sources of vitamin C include citrus fruits, melons, apricots, strawberries, berries, green vegetables, sweet peppers and tomatoes