How to Perform “bloodletting”?

Where Do You Need to Prick?

For stroke-like symptoms, traditional Chinese medicine suggests puncturing the finger tips of all 10 fingers. In my opinion, it’s a bit too much; puncturing the tip of middle finger is sufficient. Puncturing both right and left finger tips can be beneficial, but the key point to puncture is the LEFT middle finger tip. This point is called Pericardium 9 (Zhong Chong, Chinese Character 中衝, meaning Central Hub). As shown in the picture, the pericardium meridian starts right outside of the heart (PC1) and ends at PC9 at the middle finger tip. (Note: The pericardium is two thin layers of a sac-like tissue that surrounds the heart, holds it in place and helps it work.)pericardium-meridian

What do you need for bloodletting?

Sterilized medical lancets, Alcohol swabs for sterilization, Sterilized cotton balls, Biohazard trash container, First-aid cream or gel, and First-aid bandages.

How to do bloodletting

Swab the tip of the middle finger with alcohol, then insert the lancet quickly in a shallow depth. Those with a very high blood pressure may experience blood shooting out as soon as lancets are inserted (this will drop blood pressure immediately). Some may have to squeeze out the finger tips. Elicit a few drops of blood. Absorb the blood with sterilized cotton, and dispose in the biohazard trash container along with the used lancets. Make sure bleeding stops completely by pressing hard with sterilized cotton ball. Apply first-aid cream or gel, or place a band-aid on the points that are bled to prevent infection, and then wash your hands.

The frequency of bleeding depends upon the patient’s medical condition. If the patient has more than a few symptoms of a TIA on a regular basis, bleeding can be performed once a day until the symptom abates. If the patient has a mild condition, bleeding can be done 1-2 times per week.

For nutritional support, I would highly recommend a supplement called “Cardo-Plus” produced by Standard Process. I would love to hear from you if you would practice bloodletting and what kind of results you have experienced.

For general health of the heart, I cannot think of anything better than “meditation focusing on slow breathing.”  If you suspect you have some TIA symptoms, think of it as if your “inner self” is calling for your attention.

Ulcerative Colitis Medical Options

According to western medicine, ulcerative colitis is a chronic non-specific idiopathic gastrointestinal inflammatory disease. Several etiologic factors have been suggested, but none are proven at the present time. Since there is no known cause, specific therapy is not available and all available drug treatment focus on symptomatic relief. Surgery cures the disease but will require permanent ileostomy (cutting off a portion of the large intestines) in addition to physical and emotional burden.

Most common medications to treat ulcerative colitis include: Aminosalicylates, Sulfasalazine (Azulfidine), Mesalamine (Asacol, Rowasa), Balsalazide disodium (Colazal), Corticosteroids (such as budesonide, prednisone, and prednisolone). In addition, immune system suppressors, nicotine patches, anti-diarrheal medications are often used.

Surgical Procedures

20 to 30% of people with ulcerative colitis must eventually have their colon or colon and rectum removed (colectomy or proctocolectomy) because of massive bleeding, severe illness, rupture of the colon, or the risk of cancer.  Although the surgery often eliminates the disease, it may result in having 5 to 7 watery bowel movements a day, and up to one-third of people who undergo this procedure develop pouchitis, an inflammation of the pouch that was created to reconnect the severed intestines to the rectum.

Crohn’s Disease Symptom Relief

Crohn’s disease is a medical condition that can cause chronic inflammation anywhere in the GI tract–from the mouth all the way to the rectum.

Often, the inflamed tissue is specifically found in the ileum (the end of the small intestine) and the beginning of the colon. Inflammation can spread into the deeper layers of the tract and frequently has what is known as a “cobblestone appearance.”

crohns' diseqse

Symptoms vary from patient to patient, and may include persistent, recurrent diarrhea, bleeding from the anus, urgent need to evacuate the bowels, constipation or feeling of incomplete evacuation, abdominal cramping, abdominal pain, loss of appetite, weight loss, fatigue, mental and physical developmental delays (in certain cases occurring amongst children), fever, night sweats, or irregular menstrual cycle

crohn's disease 2

Crohn’s is a difficult condition to cure. In some cases, surgery to repair or remove affected areas of the GI tract is necessary.

It is important to receive an early diagnosis as untreated Crohn’s disease can eventually cause life-threatening symptoms such as tears in the lining of the rectum and fistulas.

Fissures can cause excess bleeding and pain. Fistulas happen when inflammation erodes tissue, causing the formation of a tunnel starting from the intestines, going to the urinary bladder, vagina or even the skin.

I cannot stress enough how important diet is in reducing some symptoms.