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Self-acupressure on the Suboccipital Muscles

The good news is that you don’t need to know exactly where the muscles are or what their names are. Wherever it hurts and feels tense around the suboccipital area, apply gentle but firm pressure, two or three minutes at one place, then move to the next tender spot.

Personally, I start with the mid-centerline right underneath the occiput, using my middle self massage suboccipitalfinger on both sides, tilting the head slightly backward. Very often, I am startled to find out how much of tension there is on that point. About two minutes will do the job.

Then, I move my fingers downward, slightly outside of the mid-centerline. I stay at tender spots for about two minutes.

The next step is go to wherever there is tenderness in the whole region. Since I am well aware of major acupuncture points in the area, I go through several points such as:

    1. Gallbladder 20: Headache; visual dizziness; pain and stiffness of the neck; gb20bl10painful reddening of the eyes; deep-source nasal congestion; pain in the shoulder and back; heat diseases; common cold; epilepsy.
    2. Bladder 10: Pain and stiffness of the neck, occipital headaches, upper back/shoulder pain, cold and flu symptoms, eye pain and blurry vision, epilepsy, manic episodes, excessive talking.  
    3. GV 16: headaches, stiff neck, aversion to cold and wind, dizziness, numbness, twitching of eyelids, asthma, difficulty of breathing, MANIA and Hysteria.

Some people use tennis ball, massage instruments, and/or some other apparatus. I’ve found that nothing works better, faster than your own fingers. If you have bad arthritis on the fingers, use some towel, roll it up tightly, and lay on top of it, placing the towel right under the occiput.

It usually takes 10 minutes to release the tension in the suboccipital area. You will be amazed at how wonderful you will feel if you practice these self-acupressure on yourself. Not only your tension and headaches will be minimized, you will feel much clearer in your thinking, even feel peaceful. If you have tendency to have “excessive nervous talking, mania, and/or hysteria,” this self massage will certainly help a great deal.

 

0 comments on “Suboccipital Muscles”

Suboccipital Muscles

subocci-pain

The suboccipital muscles are a group of four muscles located on each side of the back of the neck just below the base of the skull. The muscles connect the skull with the top two vertebrae of the neck. Located right underneath the occipital bone (the pronounced protrusion of the back of the head), there are four paired muscles as shown in the suboccipital musclespicture.

These muscles are designed to sit right on top of the cervical spine, however, most of us tend to lean forward habitually. Texting, using computers, or even when we eat, we place our ears way forward than our shoulders. As a result, these suboccipital muscles tend to get stretched too much on one wide, crunched up, and stiffened over time. Misalignment of the suboccipital muscles becomes a prime cause of head and neck tension and shoulder aches. Prolonged neck tension may permeate toward the frontal area, causing temple and frontal headaches, and may interfere with the blood flow to the eyes, resulting in painful & burning eye syndromes.

 

0 comments on “Stiff neck, Migraines, and Eye pain? Release Suboccipital Muscles”

Stiff neck, Migraines, and Eye pain? Release Suboccipital Muscles

scalpelpointsOver the course of years of treating human body, I’ve found close to 100% of people over the age of 35 have very stiff neck. Stiff and rigid neck often accompany migraines, shoulder pain, frontal sinus headaches, and eye pain. It’s hard to believe, but stiff neck is also directly associated with the lower back and sacrum pain. There’s an easy way to deal with these issues: self-massage the suboccipital muscles, behind your head.  

0 comments on “Extreme Fatigue That Doesn’t Go Away?”

Extreme Fatigue That Doesn’t Go Away?

Four Point Technique can do a wonder in addressing chronic fatigue

Extreme fatigue or tiredness that doesn’t go away can be quite debilitating. The causes of chronic fatigue aren’t well-understood in conventional medical science. fatigue 3Chronic fatigue can be caused by viral/bacterial infection, overgrowth of parasites,  psychological stress, nutritional deficiencies, and/or thyroid issues. Although fatigue can affect anyone, women in their 40s and 50s seem to get hit most often.

The good news is that you can deal with chronic fatigue quite effectively just by massaging two different acupuncture points (actually four points including both left and right side of the body), one in the hands and the other in the feet. For centuries, martial arts, Qigong, Nei Gong, or Taoist meditation practitioners have used the same technique revitalize themselves. Specifically, I use these four points to resolve exhaustion among chemotherapy patients.  

0 comments on “How to Stop Leg Cramps (Stronger Version)”

How to Stop Leg Cramps (Stronger Version)

To deal with leg cramps that do not respond well to those lighter version remedies, here are a few things you can try.

  1. Soak your feet in hot water mixed with epsom salt for 20 minutes. Fill hot (lukewarm rarely works) water in a basin big enough to hold both feet, then add ½ cup of epsom salt. Water level has to be high enough to cover the ankles. Put your feet into the basin, regardless how hot the water initially feels.  epsom salt footbathWith heat, all six meridians running on your feet– kidneys, liver, spleen, stomach, gallbladder, and bladder–start to open up and Qi and blood flow into the areas of blockage. Chinese medicine regards every single disorder, including leg cramps, as stagnation of Qi and blood flow. Approximately 20 minutes later, you will feel warm and tingly sensation in the lower half of the body.

(Note: Our feet have the most and largest pores of the body, therefore with salt will not only draws toxins out of the body, the body absorbs the magnesium in epsom salts. This method effectively deals with chronic arthritis in the feet and ankles, plantar fasciitis, achilles heel tendonitis, and even toenail fungus infections.)

  1. After the foot bath, make a fist and rub on the center of the soles.

     3. Press and knead on the following points: Taixi (KD3), Kun Lun (BL60), Cheng Shan  (BL57), Yang Ling Quan(GB 34), Zu San Li (ST36). Use the thumb to knead forcefully on each point for 30 seconds.

kd3Bladder-60BL57gb34st36

  1. Squeeze and roll the calf muscles with both hands, begin at the ankle and move gradually upwards, for 2 minutes.

The above is suggested to be a routine before sleep. You can try one or more of the above remedies to find out to which protocols your body reacts most favorably. In a few days, most of your leg cramps will be eliminated.

Chronic and persistent leg cramps usually indicate serious internal orders, most notably pre-diabetic conditions or active diabetes. Please pay attention to your sugar consumptions, and other lifestyle or diet changes.

 

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The Buddhist Triangle

There are many acupuncture points in addressing anxiety issues.  Most famous one is called “YinTang” which is located in the midpoint between the eyebrows. Another one is “TaiYang” which is right on the temples, between the outer edge of the eyes and the hairline. I’ve written about these points many times previously. Beside these points, many doctors in China use the Buddhist triangle points in treating anxiety and depression.

buddhist triangleThe Buddhist triangle is situated on your wrist. As shown in the picture, three points–Lung 9, Pericardium 6, and Heart 7– form a triangle on the palmar side of the wrist. Three of these points form a potent combination to reduce anxiety and calm the nervous system.  

Lung 9 (On the radial crease of the wrist where the radial artery pulsates): As the ‘source point’ of the Lung meridian, this point opens up the blockage of the entire Lung meridian. This point makes breathing easier, reduce phlegms, eliminate asthmatic conditions, and warm cold hands and feets. Since the Lung is directly associated with “grief and sadness,” opening up Lung 9 will alleviate overall feeling of sadness, depression, heaviness of the heart.

Pericardium 6 (On the palmar aspect of the forearm, about 1.5 inches above the crease of the wrist, between two tendons): PC 6 opens the chest, protects the heart, calms the spirit, relieves nausea and vomiting. This is an extremely popular and useful point. It is very helpful in treating insomnia, melancholiness, and repressed emotions.

Heart 7 (On the ulnar crease of the wrist between two tendons): Called ShenMen (meaning the gate of spirit), HT7 is the source point of the heart meridian. This point is widely used in treating insomnia, amnesia, cardiac pain, palpitations due to fright, mania, epilepsy, and even stupor. HT7 is “the” point for emotional issues, especially excessive anxiety and worry.

A gentle but firm pressure on these triangle points for 4-5 seconds each, twice a day, may provide a significant relief in dealing with anxiety, depression, frustration, eating disorders, pent-up anger, and other repressive emotions. You can use blunt side of a ballpoint pen in pressing these points.  

0 comments on “Anxiety–Our Formidable Foe”

Anxiety–Our Formidable Foe

Although I’ve written on anxiety/depression many times, a dramatic increase of calls/inquiries regarding anxiety made me re-address the same subject one more time. In fact, I’ve never seen this kind of spike on anxiety concerns for the last 15 years. Shockingly, it’s not just among adults; more teenagers and children under 10 report that they simply cannot cope. Many people are at a loss about what to do with growing anxiety. In the next two blog articles,  I will examine why anxiety has become a national epidemic and introduce Buddhist triangle acupuncture points, hoping that self-administered acupressure on these points may provide much-needed help in relieving anxiety, depression, and stress.