Infertility, Fertility and Acupuncture

If you try to get pregnant, try acupuncture first. In 2014, we saw an amazing 90% success rate of pregnancy among our patients.

Most of these patients received medical fertility treatment along with acupuncture; some were treated only with acupuncture and nutrition programs.

Acupuncture and proper nutrition help the body to become balanced and healthy. Acupuncture can assist your body to be far more receptive to any medical fertility programs.

fertility and acupuncture

Numerous studies confirmed a dramatic increase of success rate when using acupuncture in combination with medical fertility treatments and on its own.

A well-known German study done in 2002 followed 160 women who underwent IVF, 80 of them received acupuncture as well and 34 of those women got pregnant: a success rate of 42.5%. Of the other 80 women, those who received IVF without any acupuncture treatments, only 21 women (26.3%) became pregnant.

Another study, American, of 114 women showed that 51% of the women who had acupuncture and IVF treatments became pregnant compared to 36% of women who had IVF alone. Further analysis of the data revealed a much lower rate of miscarriage for the women who had acupuncture as well as IVF.

fertility and acupuncture2

Primarily, acupuncture for infertility increases blood supply and flow to the reproductive organs, leading to increased egg follicles and elevated hormone levels around the ovaries. Increased blood flow causes thickening of the uterus lining which is essential in sustaining an implanted embryo, and reducing the chances of miscarriage.

In addition, acupuncture increases production of endorphins, the body’s natural “feel good” brain chemical that also plays a role in regulating the menstrual cycle, egg production and ovulation.

men's fertility

In male patients, acupuncture is found to be beneficial in increasing sperm counts and sperm motility.

Acupuncture for fertility patients takes into account imbalances in the whole body, not just reproductive organs. Depending on patients’ physiological and emotional markups, we focus on treating underlying imbalances in organs such as the liver, kidney, or spleen, along with the endocrine/reproductive organs.

Easing Your Transition through Menopause

Menopause

Like a plant going through many changes with the cycle of the seasons, it is natural for a woman in her middle years to cease menstruating and to experience various symptoms associated with menopause.

The winter season of life, or menopause, is a time to take shelter and preserve energy. This is a quieter, calmer phase of life in which a healthy woman may need extra support to feel comfortable in her body. As women move from autumn to the winter phase of their natural feminine cycle, it is reassuring to know that acupuncture and Oriental medicine can be integrated into your health plan to support this transition.

menopause

Some of the most common symptoms of menopause include hot flashes, night sweats, dizziness, insomnia, irritability, mood swings, osteoporosis, and dryness. The organ system most involved in producing these symptoms of menopause is the kidney, specifically the decline of kidney yin (different from Kidney yang in Chinese medicine). Kidney yin is like a cool, refreshing reservoir of water and when it dries up, heat and dryness more readily ensue.

menopause 2

In general, yin represents the nourishing, cooling energies. When it reduces, metaphorically speaking, there exists in the body less water to put out the fire. Yang energy represents the moving, active principle which is like the rays of sunshine providing the sustenance needed for plants to thrive. However, when in excess, heat destroys plants and leaves them brown, dried and withered. Based on this premise, it makes sense that menopausal women can present with excess heat signs such as hot flashes and irritability.

menopause 3

In July of 2014, the North American Menopause Society (NAMS) conducted a large-scale analysis of previous scientific studies examining the role of acupuncture in reducing various symptoms of menopause. Out of the 12 studies analyzed, researchers concluded that acupuncture positively impacted both the frequency and severity of hot flashes. NAMS executive director Margery Gass, M.D. stated, “The review suggested acupuncture may be an alternative therapy for reducing hot flashes, particularly for those women seeking non-pharmacologic therapies.” While hot flashes may not pose a health risk in and of themselves, the severity of them may affect quality of life and cause great physical and emotional stress.

Call today to see how acupuncture and Oriental medicine can ease your transition through changes in your life!

Male Menopause? Alleviating the Symptoms of Andropause

In an effort to better describe the diagnosis and treatment of male-specific health issues that arise during mid-life, a new term has been coined in the medical community–andropause, the male equivalent of menopause.

Andropause refers to the process a man undergoes when the body produces fewer androgens (male hormones). The hormone most strongly affected is testosterone, as it is the most dominant of all the male hormones we know of. Testosterone not only plays a vital role in male development, it greatly affects the overall health of a man’s body and mind.

andropause

Testosterone directly influences many bodily functions and organs, including the heart, prostate, muscles, blood sugar, fat metabolism, bone density, libido, and mental cognition. The decline of testosterone production gradually starts in the early thirties and continues through the mid-fifties.

In contrast to menopause, which happens over a much shorter period of time, the signs of andropause creep up gradually, making an accurate diagnosis tricky. Signs and symptoms of andropause can include loss of libido, enlarged prostate, weight gain, osteoporosis, sterility, urinary problems and infections, and digestive problems.

andropause2

According to classical texts, the physical and emotional effects of aging in general occur largely due to, but not limited to, the decline of the Mingmen Fire. Also known as the Ministerial Fire, it resides near the spine, between the two kidneys and at the level of the umbilicus. This life-giving force is the fuel from which all the organs of the body draw from. For instance, the Mingmen Fire provides the warmth and energy needed to stimulate the large intestine. Once in motion, it can perform its job of excreting waste from the body.

One reason why a man may experience the loss of libido or infertility in his middle or later years is due to the waning of the Mingmen Fire. If this is the case and the fire is out, other signs such as frequent urination, sore lower back or knees and/or lethargy may also be present.

andropause 3