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How to Get Rid of Heartburn (It’s a Long-Term Project)

1. What to Eat

Eat plenty of fresh fruits, vegetables, and whole grains (except wheat). papayaFavor enzyme rich foods, including papayas, mangoes, sweet potatoes, yams, figs, brown rice, oats, pearl barley, daikon radish, apples, parsley, coriander, mint, dill, rosemary, ginger, bay leaf, fennel, dill, oregano, cilantro, sage, and anise.

2. What Not To Eat

Avoid Wheat, Dairies, and Sugar as much as possible. If you can do this, you can win half a battle. If you get rid of these three items, all there’s left are protein, vegetables, fruits, fat, and non-wheat grains. Avoid acidic foods, such as tomatoes, coffee, tea, wine, citrus fruits, pineapple, rich sauces, cream, greasy and fried foods, processed foods, and alcohol. Vinegar is an interesting subject here as many natural doctors recommend apple cider vinegar to treat heartburn.

3. How to Eat

mindful eatingEat slowly and in small amounts more frequently- you should leave the table only three-quarters full. Chew each bite thoroughly – remember that digestion begins in the mouth and that your stomach doesn’t have teeth. Eat with mindfulness – savor and be grateful with each bite and do not eat while stressed, angry, or preoccupied. Don’t watch television or read the newspaper while you eat, as the distraction takes energy away from the digestive system and makes its job that much harder.

4. What to Avoid

  • Avoid lying down immediately after eating. Lying down enables the acid to reflux from the stomach into the esophagus. During a flare-up, avoid lying flat on your prop-upback when you sleep- instead prop up your head and upper body with pillows at a 45-degree angle.
  • Certain drugs, including antidepressants and sedatives, as they can worsen heartburn. Talk to your doctor about alternatives. Avoid smoking, as nicotine is a muscle relaxant and can relax the esophageal opening in the stomach, making it easier for acid to spill into it.

5.  Home Remedies for Heartburn

  • potato juiceJuice 1 large or 2 small white russet potatoes. Discard the pulp, mix the juice with an equal amount of hot water, and drink on an empty stomach first thing in the morning.

 

  • JDaikonuice 1 medium daikon radish. Discard the pulp, mix the juice with an equal amount of hot water, and drink once a day after eating.
  • For really bad heartburn, dissolve 1 teaspoon baking soda in an 8- ounce cup of warm water for immediate relief.baking soda
  • Make a tea by boiling 1 tablespoon licorice root in 3 1/2 cups of water Make a tea by boiling 1 tablespoon licorice root in 3 1/2 cups of water for 15 minutes. Strain, and drink 1 cup after each meal 3 times a day for 2 weeks. Licorice is neutralizing and helps with digestion. licorice

Lastly, acupuncture can provide quick symptom relief and restore the natural flow of the intestinal tract. You may also need to consider nutritional support to support a healthy esophageal and stomach lining and normal gastric juice production.

 

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Chinese Medicine Says Heartburn is Caused by Three Things

Heartburn happens when the excessive food and liquid in the stomach churns up stomach acid which spills up into the esophagus and irritates the lining of the upper stomach and esophagus, as shown in this picture. acid reflux

Heartburn is often experienced as pain, a burning sensation in the stomach or chest, abdominal bloating, gurgling, distention, or belching.

Let’s jump right into what Chinese medicine says about heartburn, or overall indigestion.Chinese medicine says there are three main causes of indigestion:

  1. Poor diet damages the spleen-pancreas-stomach network.
  2. Emotional turmoil stressed the liver-gallbladder network, slows down the digestive process, and potentially cause hiatal hernia by pulling the stomach upward into the diaphragm.
  3. Pathogens in a post-nasal mucus drip or food-borne microbes can invade the stomach, causing upheaval.

In a nutshell, Chinese medicine views heartburn is not just a digestive malfunction, rather it is a mixed bag of poor diet, emotional/psychological issues, and immune functions relating to sinuses. I can vouch for this theory as almost all of the heartburn patients I have treated demonstrated stress/anxiety syndromes, chronic mucus drips, and relatively poor diet patterns.

 

0 comments on “Does Your Heartburn Make You Sick?”

Does Your Heartburn Make You Sick?

Many of us suffer from acid reflux or heartburn, especially we eat more than we can chew. Eating too much of fatty, rich, spicy or acidic foods, alcohol, or drinking a lot of coffee make things worse. Eating while stressed, on the run, or late at night are actually silent killers. heartburnChronic heartburn or acid reflux is not a minor issue as it can easily develop into gastritis or esophagitis–the condition that erodes and ulcerates the esophagus, which can ultimately lead to cancer of esophagus. Let’s figure out what we can do to get rid of heartburn.

Ulcerative Colitis – Tips for Dealing With It

Both Western and Chinese medicines recognize the importance of diet and its role in prevention and treatment of ulcerative colitis. Western medicine acknowledges dietary intake of certain factors (such as certain chemicals and drugs) may be linked to increased incidence of ulcerative colitis; Chinese medicine recognizes that dietary intake with excessive cold or raw food may injury the spleen and the stomach. Therefore, diet plays an important role in both prevent and effective treatment of the illness.

Food won’t prevent or cure IBD, but the right diet may diminish symptoms. The strategy is to focus on foods that reduce inflammation, to reestablish healthy bacteria in the gut and to pamper your intestinal tract. Keeping a food diary helps determine which foods trigger flare-ups and which seem to help.

Things to Avoid

  • Avoid any food which may trigger recurrence, such as certain chemicals, raw or cold food. Milk, cheese and other dairy products should be avoided especially if the patients have lactose intolerance.
  • Avoid sugar of all forms; avoid any wheat products especially during acute flare-ups.
  • High roughage food such as raw fruits or vegetables sometimes worsen intestinal obstruction and colic.
  • Alcohol should be avoided as it may be irritating to the stomach and the intestines.
  • Caffeine and carbonated drinks
  • Nuts, seeds, dried fruits
  • Spicy food may trigger certain nerve reactions in the digestive tract.
  • Certain over-the-counter or prescription antidiarrheal drugs may worsen the condition and create toxic megacolon.

What to Add

Everyone has different triggers; therefore it’s difficult to recommend certain types of food and/or supplements. In addition to avoiding the “wrong food,” it is equally important to have adequate calorie and fluid intake as malnutrition and dehydration are common problems associated with ulcerative colitis.  In general, two strategies that work are:

  • A bland, low-fiber may best during acute flares.
  • Eat 5 or 6 small meals a day.

All of the following recommendations should not be taken unless supervised by a qualified health care provider.

  • Oral iron supplements for those with frequent bleeding.
  • Folic acid: Many people who have ulcerative colitis have low levels of folic acid in their blood.
  • Omega-3 fatty acids found in fish oil: DO NOT take high doses of fish oil if you take blood-thinning medication.
  • Probiotics: Consult your doctor to be sure probiotics are appropriate for your case.
  • Vitamin D: is necessary to maintain strong bones. People with ulcerative colitis, especially those who take corticosteroids, often have low levels of vitamin D and are at risk for osteoporosis.
  • Calcium: is also needed for strong bones. Ask your doctor if you need a calcium supplement.
  • N-acetyl glucosamine: Preliminary research suggests that N-acetyl glucosamine supplements or enemas may improve symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease.
  • Psyllium seeds: Psyllium is a type of insoluble fiber, and may be irritating to some people, especially during flares. Some people may have better results using soluble fiber, such as flax seed or oat bran, in combination with or instead of psyllium.
  • Boswellia: Boswellia has anti-inflammatory properties.
  • Curcumin or turmeric: This has anti-inflammatory properties. People with gallbladder disease or gastro esophageal reflux disease (GERD), hormone-related cancers, or people who are taking blood-thinning medications, should not take curcumin without first consulting with their doctors.
  • Slippery elm: is a demulcent (protects irritated tissues and promotes their healing). Women who may be pregnant should never take slippery elm.
  • Marshmallow: is a demulcent and emollient. Avoid marshmallow if you have diabetes.
  • Chamomile: is often used to soothe digestive tract. It is usually taken as a tea. Chamomile can cause allergic reactions in some people, particularly those who are sensitive to ragweed. Medicine

Ulcerative Colitis – Treating with Nutrition Response Testing

We have successfully treated a number of patients with chronic ulcerative colitis, diverticulitis (caused by small pouches of inflammation in the large intestines), and other irritable bowel syndromes with nutrition response testing.

All patients were instructed to stay away from three No-No: Wheat, Sugar, and Dairy Products.

Sometimes, the major cause of ulcerative colitis was found to be over-growth of particular bacteria strains in the liver; at other times, the kidneys overloaded with chemical toxins were the underlying reason for ulcerative colitis. Most patients also demonstrated weakness of the thyroid glands, the thymus glands, and the stomach and spleen.

Although it takes some time to see marked improvement, some patients responded almost immediately with just two supplements: standard process’ Zymex and Spanish Black Radish.

Other supplements we typically recommend for the bowel-related diseases are: Multizime, Spleen PMG, Gastrex, Livaplex, and Thymex—all from standard process. We also incorporate certain Chinese herbal remedies and acupuncture in nutrition response testing when it comes to ulcerative colitis.

If you or your loved ones demonstrate symptoms of ulcerative colitisis and other bowel-related diseases, please call us at 201.760.8811

Ulcerative Colitis – Treating with Chinese Medicine

Chinese medical texts rarely differentiate Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, or other chronic inflammatory intestinal disorders. In Chinese medical terms, most ulcerative intestinal disease is classified as spleen deficiency type, because it is believed that the spleen Qi is necessary to maintain the health of the intestines.

More specifically, any bowel-related issues can be caused by four major factors, all of them involving stomach/spleen deficiency.

  1. Stomach/Spleen Deficiency: Most common cause of any bowel-related and any other digestive disorders.
  2. Deficiency Complicated by Cold: Usually cold in the stomach and spleen meridians affect either the small or the large intestines.
  3. Deficiency Complicated by Damp Heat: Severe pain and/or bleeding can be caused by damp heat lodged in the intestines.
  4. Qi and Yin Deficiency: deficient Qi causes stagnation of the stomach and the spleen over time; not enough Yin (cooling element) makes Yang (hot element) invading the stomach, spleen, and liver meridians.

Chinese medical practitioners can establish protocols by examining the underlying causes of ulcerative colitis, not just symptomatic demonstrations. Quite often, acupuncture alone cannot effectively deal with this particular disease, and Chinese herbal concoctions (most notable is Jianpilling) are strongly recommended, along with strict diet changes.

A word of caution is that Chinese medicine, however, has its limitations. If the patient has such complications as toxic colitis or toxic megacolon, immediate hospitalization is required. In addition, serious complications such as massive hemorrhage, free perforation, or fulminating toxic colitis require immediate surgical intervention.

Ulcerative Colitis Medical Options

According to western medicine, ulcerative colitis is a chronic non-specific idiopathic gastrointestinal inflammatory disease. Several etiologic factors have been suggested, but none are proven at the present time. Since there is no known cause, specific therapy is not available and all available drug treatment focus on symptomatic relief. Surgery cures the disease but will require permanent ileostomy (cutting off a portion of the large intestines) in addition to physical and emotional burden.

Most common medications to treat ulcerative colitis include: Aminosalicylates, Sulfasalazine (Azulfidine), Mesalamine (Asacol, Rowasa), Balsalazide disodium (Colazal), Corticosteroids (such as budesonide, prednisone, and prednisolone). In addition, immune system suppressors, nicotine patches, anti-diarrheal medications are often used.

Surgical Procedures

20 to 30% of people with ulcerative colitis must eventually have their colon or colon and rectum removed (colectomy or proctocolectomy) because of massive bleeding, severe illness, rupture of the colon, or the risk of cancer.  Although the surgery often eliminates the disease, it may result in having 5 to 7 watery bowel movements a day, and up to one-third of people who undergo this procedure develop pouchitis, an inflammation of the pouch that was created to reconnect the severed intestines to the rectum.